May 12, 2013

{GAPS} Apple Pancake (and update)

Posted in bread, breakfast, child-friendly, dessert, GAPS friendly tagged , , , , , , at 9:29 pm by Jordan

We’ve completed our three month commitment to GAPS, but we’re pretty much still eating “full GAPS”. We love the food, and it’s not that hard to stay on it at home. We are adding healthy things that we miss (like quinoa) in slowly, and we’re not quite as stringent when outside the house (like eating pasteurized cheese at a party).

Here’s a GAPS recipe that’s totally yummy even if you don’t have to avoid grains! (Original recipe here on the Health, Home, & Happiness blog)

Apple pancake with coconut manna

GAPS apple pancake (we serve it with coconut manna)

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March 26, 2013

Donuts! {GAPS}

Posted in bread, breakfast, child-friendly, dessert, GAPS friendly, side, snacks, Uncategorized tagged , , , , , , , , , at 8:15 pm by riahjoy

Donuts

 

Well I guess the girls have fallen off the blogging wagon and lost their posting momentum! This is mom again…

Most of us are now on Full GAPS and we’re enjoying a bit more freedom in what we can eat. We missed raw fruit and veggies quite a bit and of course there are more baked good options now including donuts and waffles! These are made from white beans and coconut flour – toppings are fermented blueberries, coconut manna spread, local raw honey, and nut butter (made from sprouted and dehydrated almonds, walnuts, pumpkin and sunflower seeds). We’re still primarily eating soups, good meats (picked up a quarter of a cow yesterday!), and ferments for another couple months. Everyone’s putting on weight (a VERY good thing in our scrawny family) and digestive systems are working well. Hopefully we’re healing any leaky gut issues and building up healthy intestinal flora….

{edit by Jordan} I found the waffle recipe! It’s here on The Spunky Coconut. We have a donut maker like this one that works just like a waffle iron, so we use the waffle recipe to make healthy donuts too!

 

Animals

February 24, 2013

4-Ingredient Zucchini Bread {GAPS}

Posted in appetizers, bread, breakfast, child-friendly, dessert, GAPS friendly tagged , , , at 8:16 pm by Jordan

4-ingredient zucchini bread

Alongside the stuffed peppers we ate yesterday, we served this zucchini bread. It has sort of a neutral-savory taste which makes it good with almond butter, honey, or yogurt (breakfast!) or with butter or sour cream (lunch or dinner).

This just might be the simplest zucchini bread recipe you’ve ever seen!

Ingredients:
6 eggs
2 cups almond flour
2 cups zucchini, shredded
1/2 teaspoon salt

Blend the ingredients together with a fork and pour it into muffin tins, a loaf pan, or (as pictured) a 9″x9″ pan. Bake 20-30 minutes at 350°.

Could it be even simpler? Yes! You can simply cut 2 cups worth of zucchini (about 2 small) into chunks and throw it into the blender or food processor with the eggs. After that’s pureed, add the flour one cup at a time, and if it doesn’t mix all the way, finish mixing with a fork.

February 14, 2013

Valentine’s Treats! {GAPS}

Posted in appetizers, bread, breakfast, child-friendly, dessert, GAPS friendly, side tagged , , , at 11:43 am by Jordan

For Valentine’s day, we made a couple special treats: heart carrots and pancakes! They were well-recieved by all (especially when the pancakes were served with a thin layer of raw honey).

Valentine's Treats! {GAPS}

I found a heart shaped carrots tutorial through Pinterest, and added a step to make it GAPS-legal. After cutting the hearts, I boiled them for about 30 minutes so they’re nice and soft. (I like to drink the left-over water – it’s sweet!)

To introduce egg whites, we made squash pancakes:
Blend 4 eggs and 1/2 c butternut squash in the Vita-mix (or blender). Cook at a low heat in coconut oil or animal fat. Be careful not to brown too much (for GAPS). Optional – cut with cookie cutters.

May 6, 2010

Sourdough Cinnamon bread

Posted in bread, breakfast, dessert tagged , , , , , , , at 9:17 pm by Jordan

I usually do this right before bed, then bake it in the morning so it’s fresh for breakfast.

Begin with a basic batch of bread dough, at which point it would be ready to be formed into a loaf.

Wet your hands and the countertop any time the dough starts sticking to them.

Begin to flatten the dough, using you hands.

Flip the dough over and continue to flatten and stretch the dough into a squarish shape.

Keep flipping, flattening and stretching the dough until it’s about 1/4″ thick. Flipping periodically seems to help keep the dough smooth and without holes.

Cover the dough with a layer of honey to taste (I put as thin a layer as possible without tearing the dough badly), leaving about an inch of the edge farthest from you “clean”.

Sprinkle cinnamon (lots!) over the honey.

Gently roll the dough away from you little by little. Take your time!

Seal the roll with the inch of clean dough that you left and quickly and carefully transfer it to the pan.

Ta da! 🙂

This is what it looks like in the morning after rising all night.

How to~Sourdough Bread

Posted in bread tagged , , , , at 8:12 pm by Jordan

This tutorial assumes that you already have and know how to care for a sourdough starter. If you don’t, please check out this post.

2 1/2 cups flour (I like Kamut or Hard red wheat best, or even a mixture)
1 cup starter (I use a “cool-rise” starter that is kept in the fridge)
1 cup water

Put the ingredients above in a bowl in the order listed and mix together. I like to use my hand rather than a spoon or other utensil. Take your time to make sure that there are no lumps of flour. You may need to add flour or leave some flour unmixed in the bottom*, depending on the consistency of the starter.

Once the dough begins to hold together but doesn’t seem to dry, put it on the counter and finish mixing it. Knead it a bit and return it to the bowl.

*If you had left some flour in the bottom, you can dump it into the starter now to feed it.

Let the dough sit, covered with a moistened towel for 15 minutes or so (you might want to set a timer…), then dump it out on the counter again.

Add 1 teaspoon salt and knead in well. Quality salt really makes a difference in the finished bread.

Return the dough to the bowl and cover. Leave for about 2 hours.

Dump out the dough once more and knead just a little. Form into a loaf, biscuits, rolls, cinnamon bread, pizza dough or whatever.

Let sit, covered with a single layer (ie don’t fold the towel) for 2-6 hours or until risen.

Bake at 350*F

A whole loaf takes 40 minutes,
A dozen biscuits takes about 20 minutes,
Pizza is baked like any other crust (depending on the thickness).

Oh, and since I’m talking about jobs for little people this month I thought I’d mention that my little brothers love it when they get involved in the bread-making process. Sometimes they get their own little bit of dough to knead and shape however they like. When we make Pizza, they can help add toppings. It’s easier than you think to include little ones in the kitchen. One tip though–make sure you’re already familiar with the recipe… I tried to make my first cheesecake with a four-year-old… it turned out delicious, but the process was just a bit stressful!

Please let me know if this is clear! Feel free to ask questions too

Caring for your sourdough starter

Posted in bread tagged , , , , at 5:14 pm by Jordan

The Basics:
Feed your starter 7-24 hours before you want to use it to make bread. This activates the bacteria. You can also feed your sourdough just to keep it healthy if you don’t make bread often. It’s a good idea to feed it at least once a week. If you leave it alone longer, just be sure to feed it twice before making it, allowing 7-24 hours between feedings. Starters have been known to last 3 months or more without being fed, so long as they receive a little TLC when being “brought back”.

Generally, you’ll want to feed the sourdough this way:
one part starter
one part flour
one part water
Depending on the type of flour you’re using, the amount of time since you fed last, and other variables, these measurements may be off. You can also feed the sourdough with much less flour, especially if your starter is getting too large. Just add the amount of flour you’d like to the starter, stir it in a bit and add water to make it the consistency of pancake batter.

Some things to remember
*Don’t over-feed your starter (if you have 1 cup of starter, never add more than 1 cup of flour)
*keep your starter soupy–it should look like pancake batter
*be gentle–if you over-stir your starter it will get to glutenous and elastic
*the starter will naturally separate and may turn any shade of brown or black. This is normal. If it turns pink, though, you have bad bacteria. It’s a good idea to dispose of pink starter altogether, though some say it’s possible to use a bit of the bad stuff to start a new batch of good stuff.
*again, black’s ok, pink, not so much.

Please comment and let me know if this is clear. I’d be more than happy to answer any questions! If you know something about sourdough starter that I haven’t mentioned, please comment–I might just edit it into this post (with due thanks, of course)!